TRAVELING WITH MEDS

When we travel, it’s normal to prepare by making sure we have enough of our needed medications. These could include over-the-counter aids such as acetaminophen (Tylenol) and diphenhydramine (Benadryl) or prescription medications for particular conditions. But how often do you take precautions to make sure your medications will be legal for international travel?

Depending on what medications you need, you may need to take extra steps to ensure your medications will make it out of the airport. Some active ingredients or preparations are illegal or restricted in certain countries, so you should consider checking with your physician 4-6 weeks in advance of your trip to ensure that your prescriptions and supplements are safe for international travel. If you can, it’s helpful to get a letter from your doctor detailing your prescriptions and why they’re medically necessary.

All medications, even over-the-counter pills or vitamins, should be stored in their original labeled container, and the name on your prescription bottle should match the name on your passport. Some devices require special documentation submitted to the foreign government in advance of your trip; for example, EpiPens and insulin syringes will flag airport security in some countries. Contact the embassy of your destination country well before your departure to avoid surprises.

 


The information posted on this blog and website are for general information only and should never be relied on as specific medical advice for an individual reader.  No financial relationship exists between us and any recommended products or persons mentioned. All material contained here is the property of the Sheldon Sowell Center for Health, PC, and cannot be copied, reprinted, or linked to without our express permission.
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