THE TICKER AND THE CLOCK, PART 1

If you’ve got a heart condition, you’ve probably heard that early mornings, particularly Mondays, are when most cardiac arrests happen.

Not so, according to a new study in HeartRhythm. The authors said that after analyzing thousands of cases, they could not detect the familiar pattern. Rather, nearly a third of cardiac arrests happened in the afternoon.

One possible explanation is that the modern, always-connected lifestyle may be affecting our circadian rhythms, and actually changing how the heart functions at various times in the day. Another is that doctors may be getting better at diagnosing the sorts of events that were happening all along.

 


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303.789.4949
1780 South Bellaire Street #700
Denver, CO 80222

303.789.4949
1780 South Bellaire Street #700
Denver, CO 80222